Extreme Heat

With the title of “Sunshine State,” hot weather is common in Florida and is especially pronounced during the summer months. When high temperatures combine with high humidity levels, our bodies feel hotter than the actual temperature. This is called the heat index and is due to the increased moisture in the air limiting the body’s ability to cool off through sweating. When the heat index reaches 105° F, or higher, conditions can become dangerous for both people and pets. Another tool for indication of potential heat stress is called Wet Bulb Glob Temperature. It factors several parameters, including temperature, humidity, cloud cover and wind. Wet Bulb Globe Temperature readings are available from the UF WeatherSTEM station on campus.

What to Know

  • Heat-Related Illnesses: Symptoms and guidance from the CDC.
  • Excessive Heat Warning:  Issued by the National Weather Service within 12 hours of when the maximum heat index temperature is expected to be 105° or higher for at least 2 days and night time air temperatures will not drop below 75° F.
  • Excessive Heat Watch: Issued when conditions are favorable for an excessive heat event in the next 24 to 72 hours.
  • Heat Advisory:  Issued within 12 hours of the onset of extremely dangerous heat conditions, generally when heat index temperature is expected to be 100° F or higher for at least 2 days and night time air temperature will not drop below 75° F.
  • Excessive Heat Outlook:  Issued when a potential exists for an excessive heat event in the next 3-7 days.

What to Do

Follow Take Action Guidance when appropriate.

The record high temperature for Gainesville is 104° F, set on June 27, 1952. The hottest temperature ever recorded in Florida was 109° F on June 29, 1931, in Monticello.

Get More Info:

NWS – Heat Safety

Ready.gov – Extreme Heat

CDC – Extreme Heat